Bishops – St Matts Laramie http://stmattslaramie.com/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:18:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stmattslaramie.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-2022-01-25T213047.278.png Bishops – St Matts Laramie http://stmattslaramie.com/ 32 32 Colorado bishops should pressure Democrats to do the right thing https://stmattslaramie.com/colorado-bishops-should-pressure-democrats-to-do-the-right-thing/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:36:48 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/colorado-bishops-should-pressure-democrats-to-do-the-right-thing/ Should bishops get involved in political issues? Joseph Rummel thought so. The Archbishop of New Orleans expressed his opposition to segregation in the late 1940s and began desegregating churches and schools within the archdiocese a few years later. “Racial segregation as such is morally wrong and culpable because it is a denial of the unity […]]]>

Should bishops get involved in political issues? Joseph Rummel thought so. The Archbishop of New Orleans expressed his opposition to segregation in the late 1940s and began desegregating churches and schools within the archdiocese a few years later.

“Racial segregation as such is morally wrong and culpable because it is a denial of the unity and solidarity of the human race as designed by God,” he wrote.

He not only refuted segregation in private institutions, but the segregation laws themselves. Catholic lawmakers were warned that if they worked to perpetuate such laws, they risked excommunication, the Church’s harshest censorship. When three prominent members of the church staged protests against the archdiocese, they received letters of “fatherly warning” and, having ignored them, were excommunicated. Two of the people publicly recanted their opposition to desegregation and were reinstated as members of the church.

Earlier this month, Denver Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, Pueblo Bishop Stephen J. Berg, Colorado Springs Bishop James R. Golka, and Denver Auxiliary Bishop Jorge H. Rodriguez took a similar measure regarding Catholic lawmakers who supported Bill 1279, the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA), which codifies the ability to choose life or death for an unborn baby for whatever any reason, from conception to birth.

The Colorado bishops privately contacted 14 Catholic lawmakers on the issue of communion and abortion in the fall of last year and spring of this year, but none of the 10 Catholics who voted for RHEA was receptive.

Earlier this month, in an open letter to lawmakers, the bishops asked, “Catholic lawmakers who live or worship in Colorado and who voted for RHEA, voluntarily refrain from receiving Holy Communion” until let “public repentance take place and sacramental absolution be received in Confession.”

For Catholics, Holy Communion is a sacramental meal of bread and wine guests who become the true Body and Blood of Christ eaten together in anamnesis, which means making past actions real in the present, publicly professing life, the death and resurrection of Christ.

Before participating, Catholics are urged to examine their conscience, lest they commune unworthily and judge themselves. This is true for all Christians who participate in communion.

There have been times when I did not take communion in my Lutheran church because I was struggling with doubt or anger and was not yet ready to be reconciled with God or with another person to whom I had done wrong.

Pope Francis has said those who advocate abortion have put themselves out of communion with the Catholic Church. As shepherds of their diocese, bishops can determine among themselves the best way to help the faithful to live faithfully to the Scriptures and to the teaching of the Church.

The Colorado bishops are concerned about babies and mothers affected by House Bill 1279 and the spiritual well-being of lawmakers who supported it. Their actions are courageous, compassionate and well within the tradition of the universal Christian faith.

Two thousand years ago, members of this fledgling faith opposed abortion and infanticide, both of which were common and acceptable practices throughout the Roman Empire. Christians have spoken out in public and in their congregations against abortion and infanticide, provided support to women in need, and rescued abandoned infants.

Early theologians like Tertullian, Clement of Alexandria, Ambrose, Jerome and Augustine wrote against abortion and Christians won legal protections for babies and their mothers.

The Catholic Church and many other Protestant and Orthodox Christian denominations remain faithful to this tradition of respect for human life. “If the bishops, as shepherds of the church, did not do their utmost to affirm privately and publicly the preciousness of human life and to oppose the evil of abortion, they would fail to fulfill their calling. “said Brittany Vessely, executive director of Colorado. Catholic Conference, told me.

Some have asked why the church has not taken similar action regarding the death penalty which the church also opposes. The problems do not differ in essence — all human life is precious — but in their magnitude and circumstances; since the mid-1970s, 1,548 people have died by execution and 50 million people by abortion. Moreover, a child is innocent, but the death penalty is given to someone who has committed murder.

Life begins at conception, not only in humans, but all animals that reproduce sexually and abortion extinguishes that life.

Whether the life of the child or anyone else should be protected by law is a political question decided by legislatures and courts. As with other human rights issues, bishops have not only the right but the moral obligation to intervene.

Krista L. Kafer is a weekly columnist at the Denver Post. Follow her on Twitter: @kristakafer.

To send a letter to the editor about this article, submit it online or see our guidelines for how to submit by email or mail.

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Pope Francis meets with Melkite bishops to discuss Christian survival in the Middle East https://stmattslaramie.com/pope-francis-meets-with-melkite-bishops-to-discuss-christian-survival-in-the-middle-east/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:03:03 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/pope-francis-meets-with-melkite-bishops-to-discuss-christian-survival-in-the-middle-east/ On Monday, Pope Francis met with the Catholic Bishops of Syria and Lebanon in the Vatican to discuss the “survival of Christians in the Middle East”. As the Church of the East opened its synod of bishops, which takes place in Rome from June 20-25, the pope met with Patriarch Youssef Absi of Antioch and […]]]>

On Monday, Pope Francis met with the Catholic Bishops of Syria and Lebanon in the Vatican to discuss the “survival of Christians in the Middle East”.

As the Church of the East opened its synod of bishops, which takes place in Rome from June 20-25, the pope met with Patriarch Youssef Absi of Antioch and other members of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church.

Absi encouraged Pope Francis to pressure political leaders to “draw a red line,” prioritizing the security of Christians in the Middle East, during the meeting.

The concern of the Melkite Bishops, expressed by the Patriarch, is that widespread poverty, low standard of living and dangerous situations have led to a wave of exodus from the region, especially among young people.

Pope Francis said: “You are rightly concerned about the survival of Christians in the Middle East – I too am worried – it is a concern that I fully share.”

With eparchies in Argentina, Australia, the United States, Canada and Venezuela, the Melkite Church now has a global presence, according to the pope.

The Melkite Greek Catholic Church is an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with Pope Francis, based in Damascus, the capital of Syria. At a synod in Lebanon in 2017, Absi was elected Melkite Patriarch of Antioch, Alexandria, Jerusalem and All the East.

Thousands of people have died in “beloved and martyred Syria” since Pope Francis began his pontificate, and millions more have fled the region as refugees, according to Pope Francis.

“The tragedies of recent months, which unfortunately force us to turn our gaze to Eastern Europe, should not make us forget what has been happening in your land for 12 years,” the pope said.

During the discussion, Pope Francis reiterated his call for “a fair and just solution to the tragedy in Syria” from the Syrian government and the international community.

“More than once I have met and heard the story of a young Syrian who arrived here, and I was struck by the drama he carried within him, by what he had experienced and seen, but also by his look, almost devoid of hope, unable to dream of a future for his land. We cannot allow even the last spark of hope to be taken from the eyes and hearts of young people and families,” the pope said.

↯↯↯Read more on the subject on TDPel Media ↯↯↯

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Bishops’ Pilgrimage 2022 | News from Newton https://stmattslaramie.com/bishops-pilgrimage-2022-news-from-newton/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 09:04:51 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/bishops-pilgrimage-2022-news-from-newton/ In 2015, the Bishop of Durham, the Most Reverend. Paul Butler, began a series of walks to travel through the sixteen deaneries of the Diocese of Durham, meeting various people along the way, and visiting different organizations and places with the aim of being able to know the Diocese of Durham but also an act […]]]>

In 2015, the Bishop of Durham, the Most Reverend. Paul Butler, began a series of walks to travel through the sixteen deaneries of the Diocese of Durham, meeting various people along the way, and visiting different organizations and places with the aim of being able to know the Diocese of Durham but also an act of pilgrimage and pray for the people and the regions that the bishop and his team pass through.
This year, on May 26, the Bishop, together with the Bishop of Jarrow, the Very Reverend. Sarah Clark and the Bishop’s Chaplain, Revd. Chris Knights has started roaming the deanery of Auckland, our deanery.
The party was in Newton Aycliffe on Friday May 29, as they walked there from St. Clare’s Church to visit Newton Press, where they met Paul, Stuart and Carrie. It’s fair to say that both Bishops were incredibly impressed with the community spirit and green approach of the business and both said they could have spent a lot more time there than they had. .
The next step took them on a walk to St. Francis School where they met the principal, Lisa Lakey, and staff members before meeting the students and taking a tour of the school. During the Sunday morning service at St. Clare, Bishop Sarah in her sermon said during the visit that she felt the school radiated a light. A light that had nothing to do with windows, it was a light that shone from staff and students and their friendships and relationships with each other. All in all a good morning before they left at lunchtime to walk to Shildon.

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As Charter Turns 20, Trust in Bishops Slow to Return, Cardinal Says https://stmattslaramie.com/as-charter-turns-20-trust-in-bishops-slow-to-return-cardinal-says/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 12:55:28 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/as-charter-turns-20-trust-in-bishops-slow-to-return-cardinal-says/ WASHINGTON, DC — The nation’s Catholic bishops have made strides in regaining lay trust since approving a groundbreaking document in response to the clergy sex abuse crisis two decades ago, but for the Washington Cardinal Wilton D. Gregory “the task is not done.” “We have been through difficult times,” Gregory told Catholic News Service in […]]]>

WASHINGTON, DC — The nation’s Catholic bishops have made strides in regaining lay trust since approving a groundbreaking document in response to the clergy sex abuse crisis two decades ago, but for the Washington Cardinal Wilton D. Gregory “the task is not done.”

“We have been through difficult times,” Gregory told Catholic News Service in an interview ahead of the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the “Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People.”


“With each sordid revelation (of sexual abuse or an inappropriate response from a bishop), the task becomes more difficult, the climb becomes steeper,” said the cardinal, who was bishop of Belleville, Illinois, and president of the American Conference of Catholics. Bishops at the time.

He guided the bishops through the process of drafting and approving the charter at a historic general assembly in Dallas June 13-15, 2002, months after news broke of a devastating abuse scandal. clergy in the Archdiocese of Boston and led to nationwide investigations of clergy behavior. .

The bishops overwhelmingly approved the charter in response to the escalating crisis after hours of debate and small-group and one-on-one discussions, which Gregory likened to the process that led to the reforms of the Church that emerged from the Second Vatican Council.

“It was the product of a consensus that the bishops agreed on,” he said.

The final document established minimum standards for each diocese to follow when reviewing allegations of abuse.

He also established a unique policy which saw clergy against whom allegations of abuse were founded permanently removed from the prosecution service.

The meeting allowed the bishops to hear from survivors of abuse – whom Gregory described to CNS as witnesses courageously speaking about their disturbing experiences – and to discuss the steps needed to respond to revelations that abusive priests were often moved to new parish assignments with little or no precautions to prevent abuse from recurring.

Gregory said the difficulty of restoring full trust among lay people and regaining credibility has become mired in periodic revelations that a bishop had provided “an inadequate response” to an alleged abuse.

“Certainly 20 years ago, when the charter was first promulgated and ratified, I think God’s people breathed a sigh of relief as the bishops finally took action together to resolve the issue. But… with each revelation implying that a bishop was not taking appropriate action, with each revelation that a bishop himself was engaged in this terrible criminal behavior, the progress made over the months and years has been undermined,” said the cardinal.

“Individual bishops who have been frank and honest and open with their people, they have made real progress,” he said. “But when you look at the corporate identity of the episcopate, you still have a long way to go because, again, the actions of one influence the credibility of the other.”

Calling the adoption of the charter a “pivotal moment” for the American Church, Gregory thanked the bishops, especially those who have been appointed since 2002, for ensuring that the charter continues to be followed.

“I hope this provides the proper context for people to believe that the church is honestly and frankly addressing this issue. But the charter is only one step and the implementation of the charter is the important true witness that we need,” Gregory said.

The most recent annual report examining diocese compliance with the charter was released in November by the USCCB’s Child and Youth Welfare Secretariat.

Covering the year from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, he said 195 of the 197 U.S. dioceses and eparchies participated in the audit. Auditors chose 61 entities for more detailed audits, 10 of which were conducted in person before the pandemic erupted in early 2020. The remaining 51 were conducted online. Data was also collected from 134 other dioceses and eparchies.

Of the 61 entities audited, two dioceses and two eparchies were found to be non-compliant with the charter.

As the bishops gathered in Dallas in 2002, then-Bishop Gregory called for “genuine reconciliation” and urged the bishops to engage in “sincere contrition” in response to the sin of abuse. He also urged the bishops to take steps to “make our church as safe an environment as humanly possible for our children and young people.”

The crisis, he added, has led bishops to realize the importance of “working more collaboratively with our dedicated laity, religious and clergy.”

Today, such collaboration has grown, especially through the presence of lay people on diocesan review boards and as victim assistance coordinators in dioceses, and bishops working more closely with priests. in diocesan pastoral councils, Gregory said.

“It wasn’t always an easy approach, but it happened,” he said of such a collaboration. “These are helpful, but again, they’re not an add water and mix solution to a problem that obviously has deep roots.”

At several points in the interview with CNS, Gregory acknowledged the efforts of abuse survivors who found the courage to discuss their traumatic experiences of abuse in the years since the Dallas meeting. “They are a clear catalyst for this revelation,” he said.

He also acknowledged the role of the news media in bringing clergy sexual abuse out of the shadows, saying the perseverance of journalists has contributed to greater awareness of the extent of the abuse crisis within of church and society.

“While it is dreadful to get up in the morning and read a story or see a media presentation about sordid activity, if the media had not been actively engaged, we would not have made progress. In some ways, it’s like applying antiseptic to a wound. It hurts, but it promotes healing,” he said.

Although the charter has been in place for 20 years, it did not fully address how bishops could be held accountable for improperly handling reports of abuse and Gregory said Pope Francis has always acted to reduce abuse. He pointed to the pope’s 2019 “motu proprio,” “Vos Estis Lux Mundi” (“You are the light of the world”), which revised and clarified norms and procedures to hold bishops and religious superiors accountable for the protection of aggressors around the world.

In addition, a reporting system for accepting allegations of sexual misconduct against bishops and eparchies in the United States was implemented in 2020. The Catholic Bishops’ Abuse Reporting System includes a website and a telephone number. free phone through which individuals can file reports regarding a bishop.

Gregory recalled his first visit to the Vatican as USCCB president in 2002 after the scandal broke – one of 13 he made in three years relating to the charter. “I was told it was an American problem. And then it was suggested that it was an Anglophone issue,” he said.

“Well, now he doesn’t just speak English. He speaks Polish, he speaks German, he speaks Spanish,” he said, referring to abuse crises that have emerged in other countries. “The world has come to realize much more clearly that this is an issue that has affected the church worldwide. Praise be to God, Pope Francis has provided a much more direct, active response and, I hope, effective at these problems.

He added, “So I think the Holy Father said to the universal body of bishops, you have to work on this together and you have to follow certain norms, procedures and behaviors.”

Since its adoption and subsequent Vatican approval, the charter has been revised three times, the last in 2018. Plans were for the next update to take place by 2025, but work has already begun by the Episcopal Committee for the protection of children and young people. , presided over by Bishop James V. Johnston Jr. of Kansas City-St. Joseph, Mo.

Deacon Bernie Nojadera, executive director of the USCCB Secretariat for Child and Youth Welfare, said work began ahead of schedule due to several events since 2018: the case of the former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick; grand jury investigations into clergy abuses in several states; the “motu proprio” of Pope Francis; changes in canon law; and the three-year synodal process leading to the synod of bishops in the fall of 2023.

Gregory also expressed hope that the charter would become better known to lay people. He said he regularly hears people ask about the steps the church has taken to address clergy sexual abuse and then takes the time to explain what protocols are in place, not just to Washington but in each archdiocese, diocese and eparchy.

He also said he continues to answer questions about McCarrick, the former cardinal and archbishop of Washington. McCarrick was fired by the Vatican from the clerical state in 2019 following an investigation into accusations that he abused several children early in his more than 60-year career as a cleric and abused seminarians as bishop of New Jersey.

“There are people who are still angry, outraged, disappointed,” Gregory said, “and I have to try to assure them of my affection, of my support, of my concern (for them). I can’t undo the past… I can’t deny the past either.

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Colombian bishops call for an informed vote in the presidential run-off https://stmattslaramie.com/colombian-bishops-call-for-an-informed-vote-in-the-presidential-run-off/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 08:37:46 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/colombian-bishops-call-for-an-informed-vote-in-the-presidential-run-off/ As Colombians return to the polls on Sunday for a run-off in the presidential run-off, the Latin American nation’s bishops are urging citizens to make an informed decision when voting. By James Blears and Devin Watkins Leftist Gustavo Petro, 62, is trying for the third time to become president of Colombia. He was once a […]]]>

As Colombians return to the polls on Sunday for a run-off in the presidential run-off, the Latin American nation’s bishops are urging citizens to make an informed decision when voting.

By James Blears and Devin Watkins

Leftist Gustavo Petro, 62, is trying for the third time to become president of Colombia.

He was once a member of the M19 guerrilla group, imprisoned and granted amnesty, later served as mayor and now senator.

In the first round last month, he got 40% of the vote, ten points short of an outright victory.

His closest rival is Rodolfo Hernandez, a 77-year-old self-made businessman and millionaire property developer, who is an independent candidate.

He used social media and Tik Tok to gain popularity, funded his own campaign and got 28% of the vote.

Tight race to the finish

Now, in round two, these two are nearly neck and neck.

Petro promises tax reform, pledging not to expropriate land from the rich and saying he will be pragmatic rather than radical. He also promises to step up the fight against drug cartels and organized crime.

Hernandez, who has also served as mayor, promises to cut public spending and root out corruption.

Inflation is high, salaries for many do not cover basic needs, and law and order must be fought.

Right to life, dignity, mobility

Ahead of the vote, Catholic bishops in Colombia urged people to “express their political decision in a conscious and informed way, while considering the good of the country in an ethical way.”

Msgr. Héctor Fabio Henao Gaviria, delegate for Church-State relations for the Colombian Episcopal Conference, posted a video message in which he said Sunday’s vote was an opportunity to build a “shared national project”.

He called on Colombians to reflect on issues such as the right to life, human dignity and social mobility.

Msgr. Henao Gaviria pointed out that many cities across Colombia need special attention.

He said the bishops have identified 95 cities they consider to be “at extreme risk” in terms of civil liberties and which require “urgent action to guarantee the right to vote.”

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Bishops urge EU leaders to draft enlargement plan including Ukraine https://stmattslaramie.com/bishops-urge-eu-leaders-to-draft-enlargement-plan-including-ukraine/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 06:02:55 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/bishops-urge-eu-leaders-to-draft-enlargement-plan-including-ukraine/ ROME – On the same day the European Commission issued its recommendation to grant Ukraine official status in the European Union, Europe’s bishops urged leaders to develop a realistic enlargement plan that includes the war-torn country as well as others who have long been on the waiting list. In a June 17 statement, the Commission […]]]>

ROME – On the same day the European Commission issued its recommendation to grant Ukraine official status in the European Union, Europe’s bishops urged leaders to develop a realistic enlargement plan that includes the war-torn country as well as others who have long been on the waiting list.

In a June 17 statement, the Commission of Episcopal Conferences of the European Union (COMECE) said the war in Ukraine has not only caused immeasurable suffering to innocent people, but has also “greatly called into question the vision of a rules-based international order” and has “shaken up the whole security architecture in Europe and beyond”.


The bishops condemned what they called an erosion of multilateralism, a diminishing respect for human rights and the values ​​of peaceful coexistence, and a rise in the logic of a “great power confrontation.”

They suggested that the European Union has been weak and, so far, ineffective, saying that despite the EU’s aspirations to become a stronger global player in the pursuit of peace, member states “have failed often not been able to find the unity needed to make decisive decisions”. and consistent actions, due to indifference, naivety and the predominance of particular economic or national interests over the common good.

This has been especially evident during the COVID-19 pandemic, the bishops said, insisting that the coronavirus and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine “have held up a mirror to us,” making leaders of the EU “how crucial its role is to provide new life”. strategic vision for stability, justice and peace for the European continent and for the world.

Despite their criticisms, the Bishops also commended the EU and its 27 Member States for the support they have given to Ukraine and its people, and they urged the EU and the wider international community to continue their efforts “for an end to the war, with a free, secure and independent Ukraine within its internationally recognized borders”.

“While a lasting peace will only be possible on the basis of a negotiated agreement, Ukraine’s right to self-defense in accordance with the principles of international law cannot be denied,” they said.

They called for the construction of a “new architecture of peace” in Europe and in the world, “with a basis of solid values ​​as well as respect for human dignity and the human rights of each person at its heart”.

To this end, the Bishops urged European leaders and decision-makers to renew and implement their commitment to “a credible EU enlargement process” that includes all European countries that have submitted an application, “including including the opening of accession negotiations with Albania and North Macedonia”. and the granting of candidate status to Ukraine.

The bishops’ request came the same day the European Commission, led by German politician Ursula von der Leyen, issued a recommendation for Ukraine to gain EU candidate status, marking the first step in a long road to full membership for the war-torn country. .

However, von der Leyen, in his statement on Friday, said the recommendation was made on the understanding that Ukraine is making several reforms, as admission is a “merit-based” process.

Ukraine’s admission to the EU was apparently supported by Pope Francis during his meeting with von der Leyen at the Vatican on June 10, according to a small group of Ukrainians who met the pope and asked him to intervene in the case.

RELATED: Ukrainians meet with Pope to bridge ‘ambiguous’ communication gap

The European Commission’s recommendation on Ukraine will now be discussed by EU leaders at a summit on June 23-24 in Brussels. The launch of accession negotiations requires the approval of each of the 27 member countries.

In its statement, COMECE also urged EU leaders to develop a peace strategy based on “a comprehensive definition” of peace that will help reinforce “an integral approach” to the promotion of peace and security. and to strengthen civilian peacebuilding policies with the aim of effectively preventing the outbreak of future violent conflicts.

EU leaders were also encouraged to strengthen multilateralism by fostering “value-based multilateral and multi-stakeholder partnerships” that adequately respond to regional and global challenges such as the current food and energy crises, as well as global change. climate change and the reconstruction of Ukraine.

At the same time, these partnerships must also “reduce dependence on undemocratic regimes by diversifying supply chains and ensuring their sustainability and ethics,” the Bishops said.

They called on EU leaders to engage “responsibly and collaboratively” on security issues by developing “adequate European defenses as part of a comprehensive approach”, while ensuring “monitoring strict public compliance with the principles of proportionality, adequacy, as well as respect for human rights, the rule of law and ethical standards.

COMECE also called for the transformation of international relations with the aim of creating “a truly global community, with a more effective UN at its heart and stronger multilateral cooperation to ensure accountability for international crimes”.

In a background paper provided with its statement, COMECE welcomed the EU’s contribution in terms of global humanitarian aid and developments in agricultural, trade, human rights and development policies, but criticized what she called “inconsistencies” in arms exports by some EU member states, which they say is a factor preventing the EU “from effectively promoting peace through justice” .

In an increasingly distrustful and divided world, the EU’s role, they said, should mirror what Pope Francis called for in his 2020 encyclical Fratelli Tuttiwhich says that “real and lasting peace will only be possible on the basis of a global ethic of solidarity and cooperation in the service of a future shaped by interdependence and shared responsibility throughout the human family”.

The EU, the pope said, must “rediscover the path of brotherhood” and “work together to overcome divisions and foster peace and brotherhood among all the peoples of this continent.”

Follow Elise Ann Allen on Twitter: @eliseannallen

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Bishops tackle rise in suicides in the Philippines https://stmattslaramie.com/bishops-tackle-rise-in-suicides-in-the-philippines/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 10:31:02 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/bishops-tackle-rise-in-suicides-in-the-philippines/ The Philippine Catholic Bishops’ Conference has stepped up its fight for mental health services to curb the rising suicide rate in the country. June 17, 2022 (Splashless Photo/Andreea Popa) MANILA: The Philippine Catholic Bishops’ Conference has stepped up its fight for mental health services to curb the rising suicide rate in the country. The Prelates […]]]>

The Philippine Catholic Bishops’ Conference has stepped up its fight for mental health services to curb the rising suicide rate in the country.

June 17, 2022

(Splashless Photo/Andreea Popa)

MANILA: The Philippine Catholic Bishops’ Conference has stepped up its fight for mental health services to curb the rising suicide rate in the country.

The Prelates announced June 14 that parishes would build mental health centers in local communities to provide mental and spiritual support to those in need.
The project came in response to a report by the Philippine Statistics Authority indicating that suicides increased by almost 30% in the first quarter of 2022.

“Mental health has become our priority due to the increase in suicide cases in recent months. Our office has called for more community mental health services to be established in the country,” Camillian Priest Father Dan Cancino of the Episcopal Health Commission said in an interview with Radyo Veritas, run by the ‘Church.

Father Cancino said the commission renewed his call as part of his mission to care for his flock.

“Our pastors are very much in touch with the reality and concerns of our people today. Mental health is indeed a reality that we need to address,” the cleric added.

Mental heart experts have blamed the failed government response to the pandemic that has hit the country’s economy.

The latest figures showed that suicide remained the 27th most common cause of death in the country in 2020, particularly among people aged 30-40.

The bishops called on parents to reach out to their children and parish priests, especially in cases where their children are suffering from depression.

Father Cancino said some dioceses in the Philippines have built their own mental health centers, with volunteers for counseling.

“This is a priority project and program where we would like to have more community mental health programs,” he added.

Father Cancino also urged dioceses and Catholic schools to include mental health in their curricula.

“It takes the whole community – the Church, the schools, not just the family – to deal with mental health. It takes a village to raise a child. Thus, all institutions should prioritize mental health by giving orientation sessions to those who need it,” the priest said. ucanews.com

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Catholic bishops urge politicians to tackle ‘alarming rate’ of vandalism against churches and pregnancy centers https://stmattslaramie.com/catholic-bishops-urge-politicians-to-tackle-alarming-rate-of-vandalism-against-churches-and-pregnancy-centers/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:24:13 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/catholic-bishops-urge-politicians-to-tackle-alarming-rate-of-vandalism-against-churches-and-pregnancy-centers/ NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles! Leaders of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) have urged American politicians to speak out against what they described as the “alarming rate” of vandalism against Catholic churches and pro-life pregnancy centers. Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York and Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore issued […]]]>

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

Leaders of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) have urged American politicians to speak out against what they described as the “alarming rate” of vandalism against Catholic churches and pro-life pregnancy centers.

Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York and Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore issued a statement Monday noting that attacks and vandalism against Catholic churches have been on the rise for two years and they first called on elected officials to condemn such attacks in 2021.

Since the leak of the Supreme Court’s draft opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organizationthey observed that attacks have become almost daily and that the lives of judges have been threatened.

“Last January, we prayed that all religious communities would be free to pray without fear. The motives were only rarely clear; when they were, it was often opposition to the teachings of the Church. on life in the womb,” the clerics wrote.

PROTESTER SAYS JUSTICE BARRETT, MOTHER OF 5 BIOLOGICAL CHILDREN, DOESN’T KNOW ABOUT TERM PREGNANCY

Cardinal Timothy Dolan speaks during the traditional Ash Wednesday service, at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York, Feb. 17, 2021.
(REUTERS/Brendan McDermid)

Dolan, who is chair of the USCCB’s Committee on Religious Liberty, and Lori, chair of the USCCB’s Committee on Pro-Life Activities, explained that since the court notice was leaked, “organizations Charities that support pregnant women in need have been set on fire, and Pro-life organizations have been attacked almost daily and terrorized, and even the lives of Supreme Court justices have been directly threatened.”

“In light of this, we urge our elected officials to take a strong stand against this violence, and our law enforcement to be extra vigilant to protect those who are in heightened danger. We thank those who have already done so, and we encourage them to continue,” they added.

AT LEAST 5 PRO-LIFE PREGNANCY CENTER VANDALIZED IN WEEK OF SCOTUS OPINION LEAK

Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Houston vandalized with pro-choice message.

Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Houston vandalized with pro-choice message.
(Fox 26 Houston)

CEO OF PRO-LIFE PREGNANCY CENTER SLAMS DEM SILENCE AFTER ALLEGED FIRE, CALLING IT A ‘HATE CRIME’

Dolan and Lori also praised the Catholic Church’s “long history of service to the most vulnerable, including mother and child,” and said it “remains the largest provider of social services to United States”.

“The Church constantly bears witness in word and deed to the beauty and dignity of every human life,” they said. “Above all, each of us must choose the path of peace and open our hearts to the love that God has for his children. O Sacred Heart of Jesus, touch our hearts and make them like yours.”

The office building of a pro-life pregnancy center in Buffalo, New York was vandalized and the scene of a suspected arson.

The office building of a pro-life pregnancy center in Buffalo, New York was vandalized and the scene of a suspected arson.
(CompassCare)

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Six weeks ago, Politico released a leaked draft opinion saying a majority of Supreme Court justices favor overturning the 1973 ruling. Roe vs. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide. A final decision is expected later in June.

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Rib tickling trio lined up for the Laughing Bishops Comedy Club https://stmattslaramie.com/rib-tickling-trio-lined-up-for-the-laughing-bishops-comedy-club/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/rib-tickling-trio-lined-up-for-the-laughing-bishops-comedy-club/ There’s a trio of rib ticklers lined up for the Laughing Bishops Comedy Club this Saturday (June 18). The poster for the club, hosted by Paddy Lennox and based at United Reformed Church Hall, Water Lane, Bishop’s Stortford, features Joe Jacobs, Nathan Caton and Ian Stone. Comedian, rapper and writer Jacobs’ live broadcasts swing effortlessly […]]]>

There’s a trio of rib ticklers lined up for the Laughing Bishops Comedy Club this Saturday (June 18).

The poster for the club, hosted by Paddy Lennox and based at United Reformed Church Hall, Water Lane, Bishop’s Stortford, features Joe Jacobs, Nathan Caton and Ian Stone.

Comedian, rapper and writer Jacobs’ live broadcasts swing effortlessly between hip hop and comedy and he has been seen/heard on Channel 4, BBC Radio 4, BBC 6 Music, Radio 1XTRA, and has earned millions of video views. viral online.

Joe Jacobs (57242399)

His TV work includes Harry Hill’s ClubNite on Channel 4, Nazi Pug: Joke or Hate on BBC3, and his viral rap track I’m Dog was featured on E4’s Rudetube.

Nathan Caton is presented as one of the most exciting young actors on the scene. Gigging since the age of 19, over the past decade he has established himself as both a headliner on the circuit and a name on television and radio.

He has appeared on BBC comedy show Mock The Week, Live At The Apollo and Russell Howard’s Good News and BBC R4’s Can’t Tell Nathan Caton Nothing.

Nathan Caton (57242397)
Nathan Caton (57242397)

Ian Stone is one of the country’s most talented actors and news comrades. Bold and provocative, with a laid back manner and a style of self-mockery, Ian is very comfortable joking around with an audience. He is a member of the Comedy Store’s critically acclaimed Cutting Edge team and received a 2012 nomination for Best Show at the Leicester Comedy Festival Awards.

Peter Ian (57242395)
Peter Ian (57242395)

Laughing Bishops Comedy Club tickets cost £17 or £15 with an early bird discount. See https://www.jokepit.com/comedy-by/paddy-lennox



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No10 says ‘no plan’ to expel bishops from House of Lords after criticizing Rwanda’s migration plan https://stmattslaramie.com/no10-says-no-plan-to-expel-bishops-from-house-of-lords-after-criticizing-rwandas-migration-plan/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:27:56 +0000 https://stmattslaramie.com/no10-says-no-plan-to-expel-bishops-from-house-of-lords-after-criticizing-rwandas-migration-plan/ Boris walks away from bishops bashing: Number 10 says there is ‘no plan’ to expel clergy from House of Lords after claiming Rwandan migrant plan ‘shames’ the Great -Brittany Prime Minister has ‘no intention’ of expelling 26 bishops from House of Lords, according to Number 10 Church leadership slams ‘immoral’ plan to send migrants to […]]]>

Boris walks away from bishops bashing: Number 10 says there is ‘no plan’ to expel clergy from House of Lords after claiming Rwandan migrant plan ‘shames’ the Great -Brittany

  • Prime Minister has ‘no intention’ of expelling 26 bishops from House of Lords, according to Number 10
  • Church leadership slams ‘immoral’ plan to send migrants to Rwanda
  • Cabinet ministers reportedly openly talked about expelling bishops

Downing Street today played down suggestions that the 26 bishops could be expelled from the House of Lords after criticizing the government’s migration program from Rwanda.

In an excoriating letter this week, the entire top leadership of the Church of England claimed the ‘immoral’ plan to send migrants to Africa ‘brings Britain to shame’.

The Church, led by the Archbishops of Canterbury and York, has been one of the main opponents of the £120million scheme.

Recent weeks have seen a war of words deepen between the Church and Boris Johnson, along with other senior government ministers.

But Number 10 this afternoon rejected suggestions that direct action could be taken against the Church.

Cabinet ministers have been reported to be openly talking about expelling the 26 bishops from the House of Lords – with one noting that Iran is the only other country to have religious leaders sitting in its parliament.

Yet when asked if the Prime Minister wanted Church leaders expelled from the upper house, Mr Johnson’s press secretary said: ‘There are no plans to do that. ”

Boris Johnson has ‘no intention’ of expelling 26 bishops from the House of Lords, No 10 says today

Archbishops and bishops of the Church of England - who have criticized the government's plan for Rwanda - sit in the House of Lords as Lords Spiritual

Archbishops and bishops of the Church of England – who have criticized the government’s plan for Rwanda – sit in the House of Lords as Lords Spiritual

Home Secretary Priti Patel plans to send migrants who enter Britain illegally to Rwanda to have their asylum claims processed

Home Secretary Priti Patel plans to send migrants who enter Britain illegally to Rwanda to have their asylum claims processed

The entire top leadership of the Church of England has claimed that the plan to send migrants to Africa

The entire Church of England senior leadership has claimed the plan to send migrants to Africa ‘puts Britain to shame’

Under a deal struck with Kigali in April, Home Secretary Priti Patel plans to send migrants who enter Britain illegally thousands of miles away to have their asylum claims processed.

His plan has yet to be put in place after the European Court of Human Rights blocked a first flight to Rwanda last night.

Archbishops and bishops of the Church of England sit in the House of Lords as Lords Spiritual.

In their letter this week, published in The temperaturethe current 25 members of Lords Spiritual claimed that Rwandan politics “should put us to shame as a nation”.

“The shame is ours, for our Christian heritage should inspire us to treat asylum seekers with compassion, fairness and justice, as we have done for centuries,” they wrote.

“Those who will be deported to Rwanda have had no chance of appealing or reuniting with their families in Britain.

“They had no consideration for their asylum claim, no acknowledgment of their medical or other needs, or any attempt to understand their plight.”

Their letter added: ‘We cannot offer asylum to everyone, but we must not outsource our ethical responsibilities or reject international law – which protects the right to seek asylum.’

“We must put an end to the evil traffic; many churches are involved in his fight. This requires global cooperation at all levels of society.

“To reduce dangerous travel to the UK, we need safe routes: the church will continue to defend them.

“But deportations – and the potential forced return of asylum seekers to their countries of origin – are not the solution. This immoral policy puts Great Britain to shame.

Following the Bishops’ intervention, TalkTV presenter Tom Newton Dunn reported that Cabinet ministers were openly talking about kicking them out of the Lords.

He revealed on Twitter that a minister told him, “Only Iran also has clerics who sit in its legislature.” They will go.

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